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Firefighters for the wealthy?

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He That Believeth- Boyace Van Harlan Jr., PhD

Isaiah 27:16

Therefore thus saith the Lord GOD, Behold, I lay in Zion for a foundation a stone, a tried stone, a precious corner stone, a sure foundation: he that believeth shall not make haste.

The picture context would be a suddenly descending storm, a swiftly rising and turbid storm, the flashing of the rain, the howling of the wind. The men in the clay-built hovels on the flat have to take to flight to some higher ground above the reach of the inundation, in some sheltered rock out of the flashing of the rain and the force of the tempest. He who is built upon the true foundation knows that his house is safe. Above the water-level, and he does not need to be in a hurry. He can remain quietly there until till the flood subsides, knowing that it will not rise high enough to drown or even to disturb him. When all the other buildings are gone, his stands. And he that this dwells on high may look out over the wild flood, washing and weltering to the horizon, and feel that he is safe. So that he shall not have to make haste but wait calm and quiet, knowing that all is well.

Ntozake Shange

Ntozake Shange is an American playwright and poet. Her plays, poetry, and fiction are noted for their feminist themes and racial and sexual anger. She is best known for writing For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow Is Enuf. Shange’s poetry collections include Nappy Edges and Ridin’ the Moon in Texas. She also published the novels Sassafrass, Cypress & Indigo, and Betsey Brown.

Source for image: Wikipedia / Source for quotes: AZ

Naomi Osaka Tells Ellen DeGeneres What Serena Williams Whispered To Her

Naomi Osaka dropped by “The Ellen Naomi Osaka dropped by “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” on Wednesday, opening up

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Naomi Osaka dropped by “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” on Wednesday, opening up about everything from her historic U.S. Open win to her celebrity crush.

The 20-year-old, who is of Haitian and Japanese descent, became the first-ever Japanese-born Grand Slam champion Saturday after defeating her idol, Serena Williams. Her victory, however, came amid a firestorm of controversy after Williams angrily confronted chair umpire Carlos Ramos and received three code violations.

By the time a tearful Osaka appeared for the trophy ceremony, the crowd loudly booed ― prompting Williams to embrace her young rival and whisper into her ear.

“She said that she was proud of me and that I should know that the crowd wasn’t booing at me,” Osaka told DeGeneres. “At the time, I did … think that they were booing at me. I couldn’t tell what was going on, because it was just so loud in there. It was a little bit stressful.” DeGeneres Show” on Wednesday, opening up.

James Alan McPherson

James Alan McPherson was born in Savannah, Georgia, in 1943, and raised there. His background was lower-middle class, and he grew up at a time when Georgia’s public schools were still segregated. He enrolled in Morgan State University in 1963 and earned his bachelor’s degree from Morris Brown College in 1965. During the summers of his college years, he was a waiter in the dining cars of the Great Northern Railroad, an experience that allowed him to see what the world was like beyond the segregated South, influencing his sense of social justice and providing the breadth of experience from which he has drawn to craft his fiction.

After college, McPherson attended Harvard Law School, receiving his law degree in 1968. While still in law school, he began writing fiction. His story “Gold Coast” won a contest in the Atlantic magazine, which gave him encouragement to abandon his law career. McPherson’s first short story collection, Hue and Cry, was published in 1969 by the Atlantic. He taught at the University of California at Santa Cruz in the 1969–1970 year while enrolled at the University of Iowa, where he received a master of fine arts degree from the famed Writers’ Workshop program in 1971.

After 1969, McPherson worked as a contributing editor of the Atlantic. His collection Elbow Room, which contains this story, was published to critical acclaim in 1977 and was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction the following year. McPherson has been on the fiction writing faculty of the Iowa Writers Workshop since 1981 and has been a Behavioral Studies fellow at the University of California, Stanford, since 1997. In 1981 he won a MacArthur Foundation grant. He has contributed essays to numerous magazines throughout the years. In 1998 he published Crabcakes: A Memoir, his first book-length publication in over twenty years. His essays are collected in A Region Not Home: Reflections from Exile, which was published in 2000.image

Teacher Diversity

Does The Race of the Teacher Really Matter for Students’ Learning?

Recent research shows that students, especially boys, benefit when teachers share their race or gender. Yet most teachers are white women.

As students have returned to school, they have been greeted by teachers who, more likely than not, are white women. That means many students will be continuing to see teachers who are a different gender than they are, and a different skin color.

Does it matter? Yes, according to a significant body of research: Students tend to benefit from having teachers who look like them, especially nonwhite students.

The homogeneity of teachers is probably one of the contributors, the research suggests, to the stubborn gender and race gaps in student achievement: Over all, girls outperform boys (with an exception in math in certain districts), and white students outperform those who are black and Hispanic.

There are many things that contribute to children’s academic achievement, including teachers’ experience and training; school funding and zoning; and families’ incomes and home environment. But studies have shown that teacher diversity can also make a difference in students’ performance and their interest in school.

It’s particularly true for boys, and black boys. Research has found that they are more affected than girls by disadvantages, like poverty and racism, and by positive influences, like high-quality schools and role models. Yet they are least likely to have had a teacher that looks like them.